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Charles Dickens Characters in Masque of the Red Death?

Posted: Thu Sep 06, 2018 4:12 pm
by Havard
I just watched the 2007 BBC version of Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist the other day and I started thinking about whether Oliver ever met the Dodge or any of the other children again when he grew up. He would make for an interesting character, belonging to the upper class, but with extensive contacts in the criminal underworld.

Then I started thinking about what if this all took place on The Gothic Earth?

Might use the character as pregen PCs for a one-shot, although the references might be missed on many players.

Have you ever used Dickensian characters or other literary characters in a MotRD or other D&D campaign? What do you think of my idea?

-Havard

Re: Charles Dickens Characters in Masque of the Red Death?

Posted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 1:22 am
by Digitalelf
Polyhedron had a few articles entitled "Gothic Heroes" that featured characters from both fiction and the real world. None of them provided stats for characters of Charles Dickens, but the articles would be useful if used as a templet to follow for creating similar fictional/real world characters.

As for the idea... I like it. One of the articles I mentioned provides stats for Tesla and Edison, and back when that issue came out, I thought about how I could use them in a MotRD game (which sadly, never happened).

Re: Charles Dickens Characters in Masque of the Red Death?

Posted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 4:33 am
by Cromstar
Masque is made for literary characters, definitely.

Dickens' stories could have knock-on effects and the like on the world, for sure (generally, I assume the events of a novel take place when the novel was written unless its clearly set in a different time). And you can either set a story when they might have happened...or in the default time of Gothic Earth around 1890.

Twist, for example, was written in the late 1830s...so its possible that in 1890, Oliver Twist is in his 60s or early 70s. And he could be interpreted as a hero or a villain, honestly (does he help orphans like he himself used to be or is he the new Fagin taking advantage of them?).

In my short lived campaign, I did use a few characters from literature when my characters went to London on business. I introduced Dr. Henry Jekyll and then had them practically blackmailed by Mycroft Holmes into assisting his brother and Dr. Watson with a case that my characters quickly realized was based on the Hound of the Baskervilles (specifically, I used the Howls in the Night Ravenloft adventure which is based on 'Hound' and back-ported it to Dartmoor in Devon).

Re: Charles Dickens Characters in Masque of the Red Death?

Posted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 7:20 am
by Digitalelf
Cromstar wrote:
Sat Sep 08, 2018 4:33 am
I used the Howls in the Night Ravenloft adventure which is based on 'Hound' and back-ported it to Dartmoor in Devon
That is a great adventure. I've run it for two different groups.

Re: Charles Dickens Characters in Masque of the Red Death?

Posted: Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:18 am
by Cromstar
Digitalelf wrote:
Sat Sep 08, 2018 7:20 am
Cromstar wrote:
Sat Sep 08, 2018 4:33 am
I used the Howls in the Night Ravenloft adventure which is based on 'Hound' and back-ported it to Dartmoor in Devon
That is a great adventure. I've run it for two different groups.
Definitely. Really, all I had to do to backport it was change the names and the lead in. Of course, I have to constantly remind myself I changed the names when I'm reading it.

Re: Charles Dickens Characters in Masque of the Red Death?

Posted: Tue Sep 18, 2018 5:04 am
by ripvanwormer
Havard wrote:
Thu Sep 06, 2018 4:12 pm
I just watched the 2007 BBC version of Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist the other day and I started thinking about whether Oliver ever met the Dodge or any of the other children again when he grew up. He would make for an interesting character, belonging to the upper class, but with extensive contacts in the criminal underworld.
It's worth reading Terry Pratchett's novel Dodger, which follows a character inspired by the Artful Dodger as well as various historical figures, including Dickens himself.